Oracle 11gR2 2-node RAC on VMware Workstation 8 – Part III

Time Required: 20 minutes

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Next we need to configure the Linux kernel to support Oracle 11gR2.

Before we can install Oracle 11gR2 on our new VM, we need configure the Linux kernel. The following steps modify key settings to allow Oracle to execute. These steps are taken from the Oracle install guide located at the following URL:

Linux Kernel Parameters for Oracle 11gR2 on RHEL 5

Edit the /etc/sysctl.conf and add following lines:

# added for Oracle 11gR2
kernel.shmall = 2097152
kernel.shmmax = 536870912
kernel.shmmni = 4096
kernel.sem = 250 32000 100 128
fs.file-max = 6815744
fs.aio-max-nr = 1048576
net.ipv4.ip_local_port_range = 9000 65500
net.core.rmem_default = 262144
net.core.rmem_max = 4194304
net.core.wmem_default = 262144
net.core.wmem_max = 1048576

 

Now execute “sysctl -p” command to apply the new settings:

[root@localhost ~]# /sbin/sysctl -p
net.ipv4.ip_forward = 0
net.ipv4.conf.default.rp_filter = 1
net.ipv4.conf.default.accept_source_route = 0
kernel.sysrq = 0
kernel.core_uses_pid = 1
net.ipv4.tcp_syncookies = 1
kernel.msgmnb = 65536
kernel.msgmax = 65536
kernel.shmmax = 68719476736
kernel.shmall = 4294967296
kernel.shmall = 2097152
kernel.shmmax = 536870912
kernel.shmmni = 4096
kernel.sem = 250 32000 100 128
fs.file-max = 6815744
fs.aio-max-nr = 1048576
net.ipv4.ip_local_port_range = 9000 65500
net.core.rmem_default = 262144
net.core.rmem_max = 4194304
net.core.wmem_default = 262144
net.core.wmem_max = 1048576

 
Edit the /etc/pam.d/login file and add following line:

# added for Oracle 11gR2
session    required     pam_limits.so

 
Edit the /etc/security/limits.conf file and add following lines:

# added for Oracle 11gR2
oracle    soft  nproc   2047
oracle    hard  nproc   16384
oracle    soft  nofile  1024
oracle    hard  nofile  65536

 
Check current status of SELinux:

[root@localhost ~]# /usr/sbin/getenforce
Enforcing

 
If output is Enforcing then change mode to Permissive as follows:

[root@localhost ~]# /usr/sbin/setenforce 0

 
To make the change permanent, modify the /etc/sysconfig/selinux change value of SELINUX variable to disabled:

[root@localhost ~]# cat /etc/sysconfig/selinux

# This file controls the state of SELinux on the system.
# SELINUX= can take one of these three values:
#       enforcing - SELinux security policy is enforced.
#       permissive - SELinux prints warnings instead of enforcing.
#       disabled - SELinux is fully disabled.
SELINUX=disabled
# SELINUXTYPE= type of policy in use. Possible values are:
#       targeted - Only targeted network daemons are protected.
#       strict - Full SELinux protection.
SELINUXTYPE=targeted

 
Now we are going to disable the Linux firewall, which will otherwise interfere with the RAC install. First let’s make sure the firewall service is stopped:

[root@localhost ~]# service iptables stop
Flushing firewall rules: [  OK  ]
Setting chains to policy ACCEPT: filter [  OK  ]
Unloading iptables modules: [  OK  ]

 

To permanently disable the firewall we will disable the service:

[root@localhost ~]# chkconfig iptables off

 
Now we have the Linux kernel ready for Oracle.

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